Kashmiri Pandit’s ‘kiss of life’ saves Valley Muslim in Delhi

Faisul Yaseen

Srinagar,

A coincidence meeting and a timely ‘kiss of life’ by a Kashmiri Pandit saved an almost-dying Kashmiri Muslim on a Delhi metro Tuesday night.

When Kuldeep Raina, a New Delhi-based computer professional, who Tuesday got stuck in office work till late night, boarded the Delhi metro, he found a commuter gasping for breath.
“The person was accompanied by an elderly person and two children between the age groups of four to five who were struggling to help him,” Raina said talking to Rising Kashmir over phone from New Delhi.
The Kashmiri Pandit youth said on seeing the condition of the person, he immediately initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with several chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
“The person was almost half-dead but after I initiated CPR, he started breathing normally,” he said.
Raina, who has done his Masters in Computer Applications (MCA) and works for “Ensure Services,” a mobile support service company, said it was due to some “divine intervention” that he boarded the metro at such a late hour.
“My office is in Okhla but we had to receive some official delegations at the Gurgaon office yesterday and I got stuck in office till late night,” he said. “Had I not been late, and had I not been at the Gurgoan office, the person could have died.”
Raina said the family of the person was in Gurgaon to board the bus for Ajmer to pay obeisance at the shrine of Khawaja Moinuddin Chisti but the person had suffered shooting pain following which his other family members had decided to return to Delhi by metro.
The Kashmiri Pandit youth said after rescuing the struggling person, he kept him in his lap till the metro reached the Kashmere Gate metro station.
After alighting from the train, Raina left the person with other family members who were waiting for him at the metro station.
“While leaving, they informed me that they were from south Kashmir’s Kulgam district,” he said. “Unfortunately, I did not ask for their names.”
Hailing from Laripur, Dooru near Dailgam in south Kashmir, Raina’s family was displaced from Kashmir in early 1990s at the outset of militancy following which they settled in Jammu, the winter capital of the State.
Raina, who studied in Jammu and later worked in Bangalore wherefrom he shifted to New Delhi, said his joy knows no bounds whenever he sees a Kashmiri in Delhi.
“It doesn’t matter whether the Kashmiri is a Pandit or a Muslim,” he said. ( Courtesy Rising Kashmir)

 

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